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HARTING Han-Eco® How to change a module - Assembly instruction
 
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HARTING Han-Eco®: change module
Views: 457 HARTINGGroup
Crimping of 10A  ILME turned contacts
 
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Preparation of the cable according to the advice in the ILME catalogue CN16 page 35 for the stripping length. Demo for using the CCPZ RN crimping tool for 10A, 16A, 40A turned crimp contacts. Comparison for crimping to the square crimping of the service tool CCPZ TP (ILME JEI catalogue page 153).
Views: 293 Ioannis Perysinakis
DN9 & DN20 Multipin Plugs and Receptacles from MELTRIC Corporation
 
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Meltric offers a broad range of multipin devices for use in a wide variety of control and power applications. The DN9 and DN20 Series plugs and receptacles allow multiple power circuits or a combination of power and control circuits in a single connection. Common applications include automated trailer connections, overhead crane connections, and motor connections for two or more motors. DN9 and DN20 devices are CSACUS listed for North American applications. Each device features high performance silver-nickel, spring-loaded, butt-style contacts. Individual DN contacts are rated to carry 20 amps at 480V except when 13 or more contacts are used in one device, in that case they are rated for 15 amps each. For 480 volt motor applications one DN9 can be used to connect two 5 horsepower motors. And one DN20 can be used to connect up to six 3 horsepower motors. At other voltages please consult the MELTRIC catalog for the DN’s horsepower ratings. DNs are rated for current interrupting. They may be broken under load but are not recognized with UL or CSA switch ratings like MELTRIC’s DSN, DS, and DB product lines. DN’s feature automatic IP54/IP55 watertightness as soon as the plug is mated to the receptacle. If needed, an option is available that provides additional watertightness for washdown environments. DN’s feature robust metal casings and terminal wiring capacity from 16 gage to 10 gage. DNs are also suitable for direct current applications up to 130 volts DC. When used with direct currents, the device’s CSA listing does not apply. For more information about DN Series devices visit Meltric.com where you can look up your local sales representative, peruse the online catalog or view information about other Meltric plugs and receptacles.
Views: 920 MELTRIC Corporation
Joi Lansing on TV: American Model, Film & Television Actress, Nightclub Singer
 
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Joi Lansing (April 6, 1928 -- August 7, 1972) was an American model, film and television actress, as well as a nightclub singer. She was noted for her pin-up photos and minor roles in B-movies. More Joi: https://www.amazon.com/gp/search?ie=UTF8&tag=tra0c7-20&linkCode=ur2&linkId=fef48c9417e792bf0218216419fbd463&camp=1789&creative=9325&index=dvd&keywords=joi%20lansing Lansing's film career began in 1948, and, in 1952, she played an uncredited role in MGM's Singin' in the Rain. She received top billing in Hot Cars (1956). In the opening sequence of Orson Welles's Touch of Evil (1958), she appeared as Zita, the dancer who dies at the end of the famous first tracking shot, during which her character exclaims to a border guard, "I keep hearing this ticking noise inside my head!" Lansing had a brief role as an astronaut's girlfriend in the 1958 sci-fi classic Queen of Outer Space. During the 1960s, she starred in short musical films for the Scopitone video-jukebox system. Her songs included "The Web of Love" and "The Silencers". In the 1964, producer Stanley Todd discussed a film project with Lansing tentatively titled Project 22 with location shooting planned in Yugoslavia and George Hamilton and Geraldine Chaplin named to the cast. The movie was never made. Lansing played "Lola" in Marriage on the Rocks (1965) with a cast that included Frank Sinatra, Deborah Kerr, and Dean Martin. She had previously appeared in Sinatra's film A Hole in the Head and in Martin's comedy Who Was That Lady?. She denied the chance to replace Jayne Mansfield in The Ice House, a horror film, and instead appeared in Hillbillys in a Haunted House, as Mamie Van Doren's replacement. Her last film was Bigfoot (1970). Lansing appeared in The Adventures of Wild Bill Hickok, It's a Great Life, I Love Lucy, Where's Raymond?, Noah's Ark, State Trooper, Bat Masterson, This Man Dawson, Maverick, The Mothers-in-Law, and had a recurring role in The Beverly Hillbillies. She is best known perhaps as Shirley Swanson in The Bob Cummings Show or Love That Bob (1956--1959). She appeared in several episodes as a busty model who was the foil for photographer Cummings. The series ran for 173 episodes. She also appeared as the title character in Superman's Wife, a 1958 episode of The Adventures of Superman. What was possibly Lansing's best role may ironically have been her least-seen—as the leading lady in The Fountain of Youth, a Peabody Award-winning unsold television pilot directed by Orson Welles for Desilu in 1956 and broadcast once for the Colgate Theatre two years later. The half-hour film remains available for public viewing at the Paley Center for Media in New York City and Los Angeles. In the 1960--1961 season of the NBC Western Klondike, Lansing appeared as Goldie with Ralph Taeger, James Coburn, and Mari Blanchard. In May 1963, Lansing appeared in Falcon Frolics '63. The broadcast honored the men stationed at the Vandenberg Air Force Base. By 1956, she had appeared in more than 200 television shows. She appeared in five episodes of The Beverly Hillbillies in the role of "Gladys Flatt," the unlikely glamorous wife of bluegrass musician Lester Flatt. She named Ozzie Nelson as possessing the greatest sex appeal of any actor with whom she worked. The two played a love scene in a Fireside Theater drama. The show was hosted by Jane Wyman. Lansing was sometimes referred to as television's Marilyn Monroe. Lansing broke into night club entertaining in 1965. She had taken up singing during an actors strike in the early 1960s. In May 1965, Lansing cut her first record album. It was composed of a collection of songs written especially for her by composer Jimmie Haskel and actress Stella Stevens. Lansing performed in the Fiesta Room in Las Vegas, Nevada, in July 1966. Featured on the bill were Red Buttons and Jayne Mansfield. In 1972 Joi Lansing died from breast cancer at St. John's Hospital in Santa Monica, California where she had initially been treated surgically for the disease earlier the same year. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joi_Lansing
Views: 356664 The Film Archives
Words at War: It's Always Tomorrow / Borrowed Night / The Story of a Secret State
 
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Jan Karski (24 April 1914 -- 13 July 2000) was a Polish World War II resistance movement fighter and later professor at Georgetown University. In 1942 and 1943 Karski reported to the Polish government in exile and the Western Allies on the situation in German-occupied Poland, especially the destruction of the Warsaw Ghetto, and the secretive German-Nazi extermination camps. In November 1939, on a train to a POW camp in General Government (a part of Poland which had not been fully incorporated by Nazi Germany into The Third Reich), Karski managed to escape, and found his way to Warsaw. There he joined the ZWZ -- the first resistance movement in occupied Europe and a predecessor of the Home Army (AK). About that time he adopted a nom de guerre of Jan Karski, which later became his legal name. Other noms de guerre used by him during World War II included Piasecki, Kwaśniewski, Znamierowski, Kruszewski, Kucharski, and Witold. In January 1940 Karski began to organize courier missions with dispatches from the Polish underground to the Polish Government in Exile, then based in Paris. As a courier, Karski made several secret trips between France, Britain and Poland. During one such mission in July 1940 he was arrested by the Gestapo in the Tatra mountains in Slovakia. Severely tortured, he was finally transported to a hospital in Nowy Sącz, from where he was smuggled out. After a short period of rehabilitation, he returned to active service in the Information and Propaganda Bureau of the Headquarters of the Polish Home Army.[citation needed] In 1942 Karski was selected by Cyryl Ratajski, the Polish Government's Delegate at Home, to perform a secret mission to prime minister Władysław Sikorski in London. Karski was to contact Sikorski as well as various other Polish politicians and inform them about Nazi atrocities in occupied Poland. In order to gather evidence, Karski met Bund activist Leon Feiner and was twice smuggled by Jewish underground leaders into the Warsaw Ghetto for the purpose of showing him first hand what was happening to the Polish Jews. Also, disguised as a Ukrainian camp guard, he visited what he thought was Bełżec death camp. In actuality, it seems that Karski only got close enough to witness a Durchgangslager ("sorting and transit point") for Bełżec in the town of Izbica Lubelska, located midway between Lublin and Bełżec.[4] Many historians have accepted this theory, as did Karski himself.[5] From 1942 Karski reported to the Polish, British and U.S. governments on the situation in Poland, especially on the destruction of the Warsaw Ghetto and the Holocaust of the Jews. He had also carried out of Poland a microfilm with further information from the underground movement on the extermination of European Jews in German-occupied Poland. The Polish Foreign Minister Count Edward Raczynski provided the Allies on this basis one of the earliest and most accurate accounts of the Holocaust. A note by Foreign Minister Edward Raczynski entitled The mass extermination of Jews in German occupied Poland, addressed to the governments of the United Nations on 10 December 1942, would later be published along with other documents in a widely distributed leaflet.[6] Karski met with Polish politicians in exile including the Prime Minister, as well as members of political parties such as the Socialist Party, National Party, Labor Party, People's Party, Jewish Bund and Poalei Zion. He also spoke to the British Foreign Secretary Anthony Eden, giving a detailed statement on what he had seen in Warsaw and Bełżec. In 1943 in London he met the well-known journalist Arthur Koestler, the later author of Darkness at Noon. He then traveled to the United States and reported to President Franklin D. Roosevelt. In July 1943 Karski again personally reported to Roosevelt about the situation in Poland. Karski met with many other government and civic leaders in the United States, including Felix Frankfurter, Cordell Hull, William Joseph Donovan, and Stephen Wise. Frankfurter, skeptical of Karski's report, said later "I did not say that he was lying, I said that I could not believe him. There is a difference."[7] Karski presented his report to media, bishops of various denominations (including Cardinal Samuel Stritch), members of the Hollywood film industry and artists, but without result. His warning about the Yalta solution and the plight of stateless peoples became an inspiration for the formation of the Office of High Commissioner for Refugees after the war.[8] In 1944 Karski published Courier from Poland: The Story of a Secret State (with a selection featured in Collier's six weeks before the book's release[9][10]), in which he related his experiences in wartime Poland. The book was a major success (a film of it was planned but never realized) with more than 400,000 copies sold alone in the United States up to the end of World War II. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jan_Karski
Views: 116352 Remember This
The Savings and Loan Banking Crisis: George Bush, the CIA, and Organized Crime
 
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The savings and loan crisis of the 1980s and 1990s (commonly dubbed the S&L crisis) was the failure of about 747 out of the 3,234 savings and loan associations in the United States. About the book: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1561712035/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=1561712035&linkCode=as2&tag=tra0c7-20&linkId=5a4bfa3c7e7e8c1104831acd81c8fd71 A savings and loan or "thrift" is a financial institution that accepts savings deposits and makes mortgage, car and other personal loans to individual members—a cooperative venture known in the United Kingdom as a Building Society. "As of December 31, 1995, RTC estimated that the total cost for resolving the 747 failed institutions was $87.9 billion." The remainder of the bailout was paid for by charges on savings and loan accounts — which contributed to the large budget deficits of the early 1990s. The concomitant slowdown in the finance industry and the real estate market may have been a contributing cause of the 1990--91 economic recession. Between 1986 and 1991, the number of new homes constructed per year dropped from 1.8 million to 1 million, which was at the time the lowest rate since World War II. The United States Congress granted all thrifts in 1980, including savings and loan associations, the power to make consumer and commercial loans and to issue transaction accounts. Designed to help the thrift industry retain its deposit base and to improve its profitability, the Depository Institutions Deregulation and Monetary Control Act (DIDMCA) of 1980 allowed thrifts to make consumer loans up to 20 percent of their assets, issue credit cards, accept negotiable order of withdrawal (NOW) accounts from individuals and nonprofit organizations, and invest up to 20 percent of their assets in commercial real estate loans. The damage to S&L operations led Congress to act, passing the Economic Recovery Tax Act of 1981 (ERTA) in August 1981 and initiating the regulatory changes by the Federal Home Loan Bank Board allowing S&Ls to sell their mortgage loans and use the cash generated to seek better returns soon after enactment; the losses created by the sales were to be amortized over the life of the loan, and any losses could also be offset against taxes paid over the preceding 10 years. This all made S&Ls eager to sell their loans. The buyers—major Wall Street firms—were quick to take advantage of the S&Ls' lack of expertise, buying at 60%-90% of value and then transforming the loans by bundling them as, effectively, government-backed bonds (by virtue of Ginnie Mae, Freddie Mac, or Fannie Mae guarantees). S&Ls were one group buying these bonds, holding $150 billion by 1986, and being charged substantial fees for the transactions. In 1982, the Garn-St Germain Depository Institutions Act was passed and increased the proportion of assets that thrifts could hold in consumer and commercial real estate loans and allowed thrifts to invest 5 percent of their assets in commercial loans until January 1, 1984, when this percentage increased to 10 percent. A large number of S&L customers' defaults and bankruptcies ensued, and the S&Ls that had overextended themselves were forced into insolvency proceedings themselves. The Federal Savings and Loan Insurance Corporation (FSLIC), a federal government agency that insured S&L accounts in the same way the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation insures commercial bank accounts, then had to repay all the depositors whose money was lost. From 1986 to 1989, FSLIC closed or otherwise resolved 296 institutions with total assets of $125 billion. An even more traumatic period followed, with the creation of the Resolution Trust Corporation in 1989 and that agency's resolution by mid-1995 of an additional 747 thrifts. A Federal Reserve Bank panel stated the resulting taxpayer bailout ended up being even larger than it would have been because moral hazard and adverse selection incentives that compounded the system's losses. There also were state-chartered S&Ls that failed. Some state insurance funds failed, requiring state taxpayer bailouts. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Savings_and_loan_crisis
Views: 168346 The Film Archives
A Writer at Work / The Legend of Annie Christmas / When the Mountain Fell
 
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Amanda Randolph (September 2, 1896 -- August 24, 1967) was an American actress and singer. She was a native of Louisville, Kentucky, and was the older sister of actress Lillian Randolph. She was the first African-American performer to star in a regularly scheduled network television show, appearing in DuMont's The Laytons. This short-lived program was on the air two months in 1948. Her film career began in 1936 with Black Network. She went on to do several Oscar Micheaux films, among them: Swing, Lying Lips and The Notorious Elinor Lee. Broadway roles in The Male Animal and Harlem Cavalcade soon followed. Around the same time, Randolph broke into radio, helped by people she met at The Clam House, who got her a CBS audition. She began working on various radio shows: Young Dr. Malone, Romance of Helen Trent and Big Sister. Amanda went on to become a regular cast member on Abie's Irish Rose, Kitty Foyle, and Miss Hattie with Ethel Barrymore, where she had the role of Venus. Amanda also appeared on Rudy Vallée's radio show and on Grand Central Station. She continued working in films to the 1960s, and was one of the first black women to become a comedy favorite on television. She briefly starred in her own daytime musical TV program for DuMont, Amanda, during the 1948 - 1949 season, making her the first African-American woman with her own show on daytime television.[55][56] Randolph did not settle in California until 1949, when she earned a role in Sidney Poitier's No Way Out. Even though she was working in New York and her younger sister, Lillian, had been working in Hollywood for some time, newspapers often got the two sisters mixed up, doing a story on Amanda but with a photo of Lillian and vice-versa. She then became a regular on the top early black TV show of the decade, Amos 'n' Andy, as Sapphire's mother, Ramona Smith, from 1951 to 1953; she also played the same role for the show's radio version from 1951 to 1954.[57] Amanda was now working with her sister, Lillian, who played Madame Queen on the radio and television shows.[15] She was the star and titular character in Beulah from 1953 to 1954, assuming the role from Lillian. Randolph also did some work for radio in 1956, playing the role of the folk heroine Annie Christmas in The Legend of Annie Christmas. She also had a recurring role as Louise the maid on CBS's The Danny Thomas Show and appeared in the show's 1967 reunion. (The show was aired shortly after her death.) She guest starred on the NBC anthology series, The Barbara Stanwyck Show. In 1955, Amanda opened a restaurant in Los Angeles called "Mama's Place", where she did the cooking. Despite all her film and television work, Amanda found herself slightly short of the requirements for a much-needed Screen Actors Guild pension at age 70; both sisters struggled for roles in the late 1930s. A role was written for her to gain eligibility. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amanda_Randolph
Views: 124941 Remember This
Suspense: Nightmare
 
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One of the series' earliest successes and its single most popular episode is Lucille Fletcher's "Sorry, Wrong Number," about a bedridden woman (Agnes Moorehead) who panics after overhearing a murder plot on a crossed telephone connection but is unable to persuade anyone to investigate. First broadcast on May 25, 1943, it was restaged seven times (last on February 14, 1960) — each time with Moorehead. The popularity of the episode led to a film adaptation, Sorry, Wrong Number (1948), starring Barbara Stanwyck. Nominated for an Academy Award for her performance, Stanwyck recreated the role on Lux Radio Theater. Loni Anderson had the lead in the TV movie Sorry, Wrong Number (1989). Another notable early episode was Fletcher's "The Hitch Hiker," in which a motorist (Orson Welles) is stalked on a cross-country trip by a nondescript man who keeps appearing on the side of the road. This episode originally aired on September 2, 1942, and was later adapted for television by Rod Serling as a 1960 episode of The Twilight Zone. After the network sustained the program during its first two years, the sponsor became Roma Wines (1944--1947), and then (after another brief period of sustained hour-long episodes, initially featuring Robert Montgomery as host and "producer" in early 1948), Autolite Spark Plugs (1948--1954); eventually Harlow Wilcox (of Fibber McGee and Molly) became the pitchman. William Spier, Norman MacDonnell and Anton M. Leader were among the producers and directors. The program's heyday was in the early 1950s, when radio actor, producer and director Elliott Lewis took over (still during the Wilcox/Autolite run). Here the material reached new levels of sophistication. The writing was taut, and the casting, which had always been a strong point of the series (featuring such film stars as Orson Welles, Joseph Cotten, Henry Fonda, Humphrey Bogart, Judy Garland, Ronald Colman, Marlene Dietrich, Eve McVeagh, Lena Horne, and Cary Grant), took an unexpected turn when Lewis expanded the repertory to include many of radio's famous drama and comedy stars — often playing against type — such as Jack Benny. Jim and Marian Jordan of Fibber McGee and Molly were heard in the episode, "Backseat Driver," which originally aired February 3, 1949. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suspense_%28radio_drama%29
Views: 12973 Remember This

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