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Linguistics, Style and Writing in the 21st Century - with Steven Pinker
 
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Does writing well matter in an age of instant communication? Drawing on the latest research in linguistics and cognitive science, Steven Pinker replaces the recycled dogma of style guides with reason and evidence. Subscribe for regular science videos: http://bit.ly/RiSubscRibe Watch the Q&A here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7rYAnYXIhL0 In this brand-new talk, introduced by Lord Melvyn Bragg, Steven argues that style still matters: in communicating effectively, in enhancing the spread of ideas, in earning a reader’s trust and, not least, in adding beauty to the world. Steven Pinker is an experimental psychologist and one of the world’s foremost writers on language, mind, and human nature. He is Professor in the Department of Psychology at Harvard University and conducts research on language and cognition but also writes for publications such as the New York Times, Time, and is the author of many books, including The Language Instinct and How the Mind Works. Melvyn Bragg is a broadcaster, writer and novelist. He was made a Life Peer (Lord Bragg of Wigton) in 1998. Since then he has hosted over 660 episodes of In Our Time on subjects ranging from Quantum Gravity to Truth. He was presenter of the BBC radio series The Routes of English, a history of the English language. He is currently Chancellor of the University of Leeds Subscribe for regular science videos: http://bit.ly/RiSubscRibe The Ri is on Twitter: http://twitter.com/ri_science and Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/royalinstitution and Tumblr: http://ri-science.tumblr.com/ Our editorial policy: http://www.rigb.org/home/editorial-policy Subscribe for the latest science videos: http://bit.ly/RiNewsletter
Views: 432733 The Royal Institution
The 9 BEST Scientific Study Tips
 
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Ace any exam with these study tips! How To Learn Faster: https://youtu.be/B9SptdjpJBQ 7 Exam Anxiety Tips: https://youtu.be/FyBdA61GmJ0 Check out TD http://td.com/student SUBSCRIBE (it's free): http://bit.ly/asapsci GET THE ASAPSCIENCE BOOK: http://asapscience.com/book/ Written by Amanda Edward, Gregory Brown and Mitchell Moffit FOLLOW US! Instagram and Twitter: @whalewatchmeplz and @mitchellmoffit Clickable: http://bit.ly/16F1jeC and http://bit.ly/15J7ube AsapINSTAGRAM: https://instagram.com/asapscience/ Facebook: http://facebook.com/AsapSCIENCE Twitter: http://twitter.com/AsapSCIENCE Tumblr: http://asapscience.tumblr.com Vine: Search "AsapSCIENCE" on vine! SNAPCHAT 'whalewatchmeplz' and 'pixelmitch' Created by Mitchell Moffit (twitter @mitchellmoffit) and Gregory Brown (twitter @whalewatchmeplz). Send us stuff! ASAPSCIENCE INC. P.O. Box 93, Toronto P Toronto, ON, M5S2S6 Further Reading: [1] http://www.wsj.com/articles/SB10001424052970204644504576653004073453880 [2] http://ideas.time.com/2013/01/09/highlighting-is-a-waste-of-time-the-best- and-worst-learning-techniques/ [3] http://college.usatoday.com/2014/07/29/aiming-for-an-a-study-habits-you- should-adopt-and-avoid/ [4] http://www.psychologicalscience.org/index.php/news/releases/which-study- strategies-make-the-grade.html [5] http://www.csc.edu/learningcenter/study/studymethods.csc [6] http://www.educationcorner.com/habits-of-successful-students.html [7] http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/07/magazine/why-flunking-exams-is- actually-a-good-thing.html?_r=0 [8] http://www.opencolleges.edu.au/informed/features/how-does-the-brain-learn- best-10-smart-studying-strategies/ [9] https://news.usc.edu/71969/studying-for-finals-let-classical-music-help/ [10] http://psych.wustl.edu/memory/nestojko/NestojkoBuiKornellBjork(2014).pdf [11] http://www.educationcorner.com/habits-of-successful-students.html
Views: 9813480 AsapSCIENCE
Learning Proper English for Science and Engineering
 
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Little flick 'bout my "Dscherman" accent... Support my channel: Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/TPAI Paypal: https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_donations&business=inventordonations%40gmail%2ecom&lc=US&item_name=The%20Post%20Apocalyptic%20Inventor&no_note=0&currency_code=USD&bn=PP-DonationsBF%3abtn_donateCC_LG%2egif%3aNonHostedGuest
Ian Baldwin (Max Planck Institute): Making scientific writing painless
 
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https://www.ibiology.org/professional-development/making-scientific-writing-painless/ Dr. Ian Baldwin provides his perspective on the best scientific writing practices and gives some tips on how to improve one’s scientific writing skills. Talk Overview: Scientific writing is a crucial skill that scientists develop throughout their careers. In this talk, Dr. Ian Baldwin provides his perspective on the best scientific writing practices and gives some tips on how to improve one’s scientific writing skills. He encourages scientists to write as they perform their experiments, emphasizes the importance of providing a clear message, and introduces reverse engineering techniques as an important tool to reach a concise, but clear introduction Speaker Biography: Dr. Ian Baldwin is a professor and director of the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology where he studies the Nicotiana attenuata as a model organism to understand how plants solve ecological problems. Baldwin received his AB in Chemistry and Biology from Dartmouth College in 1981 and started his graduate studies at Cornell University where he joined the Section of Neurobiology and Behavior. After graduating in 1989, he became a professor in the Department of Biology at SUNY Buffalo. He foresaw the importance of combining multiple disciplines to study plant ecology and in 1996, he co-founded the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology, a multi-disciplinary center to study the chemically-mediated interactions of plants. For his scientific contributions, he was elected a member of the National Academy of Sciences (2013), and a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (2016). Learn more about Dr. Baldwin’s research here: http://www.ice.mpg.de/ext/index.php?id=molecular-ecology&L=0
06 Tips To Improve Your English Today! - Free English speaking tips.
 
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06 Tips To Improve Your English Today! - Free English speaking tips. Stop making excuses about not having enough time to learn English. By making small changes on a daily basis; learning English will become a habit instead of a chore (or headache). You don’t need to spend an hour or two each day to get better at speaking English. Try dedicating 5, 15, or 30 minutes a day to improving your English. If you really commit to practicing English every day you will get better at it. I promise! 1. Change the language on your phone and computer operation system to English. Change the operating language on your phone and computer operation system to English. You can usually change the language under ‘settings’. Though it may be difficult to understand the first few days, you will learn new words in English without even realizing. You could also change the operating system language from your native language to English on your computer, tablet or on any social media site that you use; such as Facebook or Twitter. Again you will learn new vocabulary in English instantly. 2. Read or watch the news in English articles You may already watch or read the news on a daily basis; now try doing it in English. BBC, CNN or Google News. You will continue your “good’ habit of staying informed on what’s happening in the world and improve your English reading and/or listening at the same time. 3. Listen to Music in English and learn the lyrics. Listening to music in English is great but do you struggle to understand all of the words that they are singing? Struggle no longer! You can find the lyrics of many songs on these two websites: A to Z Lyrics Universe, Lyrics.com or you could search for the lyrics on google or your preferred search browser. 4. Write in a journal every day in English Practice writing every day. Practicing English for five or ten minutes a day will help. Write about what you did each day in English or write a story. Don’t have any ideas? Check here –English writing prompts. 5. Speak in English with someone Try to find someone to speak English with; whether it be a friend, family member or colleague from your work. The more you practice talking in English the better you will get at it. It will become more natural for you and you will start to feel less nervous when you have to speak English. 6. Watch children’s cartoons Watching cartoons is a great activity for learning English. You will hear simple English and be able to see illustrations or animation of what they are talking about at the same time. Cartoons are often repetitive so you may hear some things more than once to help you improve you listening comprehension. So, are you ready to stop making excuses and do something? Good! What action will you take today to learn English? Leave a message in the comments and let us know.
Language tips to improve academic writing
 
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Language is one area researchers often struggle with when writing a research paper. This video shares four must-do’s of research writing: focusing on sentence structure to ensure that the most important ideas are conveyed in the first part of the sentence, choosing between active and passive voice, using simple words whenever possible, and writing clearly using fewer words.
Views: 24367 Editage Insights
One Simple Method to Learn Any Language | Scott Young & Vat Jaiswal | TEDxEastsidePrep
 
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While few of us will ever take on the ambitious challenge of learning four foreign languages in a year, many of us yearn to be more proficient in another language. The secret to success as it turns out is simpler than you think. Scott Young is a blogger, speaker and author. He previously spoke at TEDx EastsidePrep about his project “The MIT Challenge” to self-test MIT’s undergraduate computer science curriculum in one year, using their freely available information. His most recent project was with Vat Jaiswal, traveling to four countries, learning languages, with the goal of not speaking English for an entire year. He writes about learning and self-education at his website, ScottHYoung.com. Vat Jaiswal is a graduate student, aspiring architect and filmmaker. His most recent project was with Scott Young on The Year Without English, where he traveled through Spain, Brazil, China, Taiwan and Korea creating four short documentaries on language learning and cultural immersion. He shares his work, including experimental time-lapse photography and an interview series with successful architects, at vatjaiswal.com This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx
Views: 1951747 TEDx Talks
How To Learn Faster
 
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Get smart with Brilliant: https://brilliant.org/asapscience Subscribe: http://bit.ly/asapsci The 9 BEST Scientific Study Tips: https://youtu.be/p60rN9JEapg Created by: Mitchell Moffit and Gregory Brown Written by: Rachel Salt & Mitch Moffit Illustrated by: Max Simmons Edited by: Sel Ghebrehiwot FOLLOW US! Instagram and Twitter: @whalewatchmeplz and @mitchellmoffit Clickable: http://bit.ly/16F1jeC and http://bit.ly/15J7ube AsapINSTAGRAM: https://instagram.com/asapscience/ Facebook: http://facebook.com/AsapSCIENCE Twitter: http://twitter.com/AsapSCIENCE Tumblr: http://asapscience.tumblr.com SNAPCHAT US 'whalewatchmeplz' and 'pixelmitch' Created by Mitchell Moffit (twitter @mitchellmoffit) and Gregory Brown (twitter @whalewatchmeplz). Send us stuff! ASAPSCIENCE INC. P.O. Box 93, Toronto P Toronto, ON, M5S2S6 References- Expecting to teach enhances learning and organization of knowledge in free recall of text passages. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24845756 The Pen Is Mightier Than the Keyboard http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0956797614524581 Sleep makes relearning faster and longer-lasting https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2016-08/afps-smr081916.php Want to Learn a New Skill? Faster? Change Up Your Practice Sessions http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/news/media/releases/want_to_learn_a_new_skill_faster_change_up_your_practice_sessions Mnemonic vocabulary instruction: Additional effectiveness evidence http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0361476X92900565?via%3Dihub The production effect: delineation of a phenomenon. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20438265 The Production Effect in Memory: Evidence That Distinctiveness Underlies the Benefit https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20804284 Why do beliefs about intelligence influence learning success? A social cognitive neuroscience model. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17392928 Exercise holds immediate benefits for affect and cognition in younger and older adults. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23795769 Subjective thirst moderates changes in speed of responding associated with water consumption http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fnhum.2013.00363/full
Views: 3861892 AsapSCIENCE
How language shapes the way we think | Lera Boroditsky
 
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There are about 7,000 languages spoken around the world -- and they all have different sounds, vocabularies and structures. But do they shape the way we think? Cognitive scientist Lera Boroditsky shares examples of language -- from an Aboriginal community in Australia that uses cardinal directions instead of left and right to the multiple words for blue in Russian -- that suggest the answer is a resounding yes. "The beauty of linguistic diversity is that it reveals to us just how ingenious and how flexible the human mind is," Boroditsky says. "Human minds have invented not one cognitive universe, but 7,000." Check out more TED Talks: http://www.ted.com The TED Talks channel features the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and more. Follow TED on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/TEDTalks Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED Subscribe to our channel: https://www.youtube.com/TED
Views: 2972878 TED
Steven Pinker: Linguistics as a Window to Understanding the Brain
 
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Steven Pinker - Psychologist, Cognitive Scientist, and Linguist at Harvard University How did humans acquire language? In this lecture, best-selling author Steven Pinker introduces you to linguistics, the evolution of spoken language, and the debate over the existence of an innate universal grammar. He also explores why language is such a fundamental part of social relationships, human biology, and human evolution. Finally, Pinker touches on the wide variety of applications for linguistics, from improving how we teach reading and writing to how we interpret law, politics, and literature. The Floating University Originally released September, 2011. Additional Lectures: Michio Kaku: The Universe in a Nutshell http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0NbBjNiw4tk Joel Cohen: Joel Cohen: An Introduction to Demography (Malthus Miffed: Are People the Problem?) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2vr44C_G0-o
Views: 1147678 Big Think
10 Things Body Language Says About You
 
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Top 10 scientific facts about your body language and position Subscribe to TheHub http://goo.gl/87YJzG For copyright matters please contact us at: [email protected]
Views: 14061002 TheHUB
5 tips to improve your writing
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ Want to become a better writer? In this video, I will share five easy and quick tips that will improve writing in formal and academic settings. If you're in college or university or plan to study overseas, this video is for you! Watch the lesson, then take the quiz: http://www.engvid.com/5-tips-to-improve-your-writing/ Next, watch my Top 5 Writing Tips video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xu2gm-Y4RXs
BEST DEBATE IN THE WORLD! @ University of Oxford. MUST WATCH!!!
 
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One of the best arguments against people who claim Islam as a religion of war.
Views: 5354224 cong baxter
What Kind of 'Asian Eyes' Do You Have?  (Test Yourself)
 
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► Buy us a coffee: https://patreon.com/kentobento OTHER VIDEOS! ★ This Is The Greatest Heist in Japanese History: https://youtu.be/gbeN-2ErxBw ★ 'Asian Eyes' Are More Common Than You Think: https://youtu.be/WxTnVWgOGLc ★ Why Asians Are 'Cuter' (Scientific Breakdown): https://youtu.be/QPrP3Y4SO_E ★ 10 REASONS Why Asians Don't Get FAT: https://youtu.be/xIqJR6xfMro ★ Why Asians Are Yellow-Skinned: https://youtu.be/rVcNy7bJyww WHAT KIND OF 'ASIAN EYES' DO YOU HAVE? (TEST YOURSELF) Asian people have many distinct features that make them look the way they do, but Asian eyes in particular may be the most recognizable. It is perhaps the most referenced physical attribute for Asian people. But what exactly makes an eye look Asian, and is the stereotypical small and slanted version accurate? In this video I go over the different types of Asian eyes - from the epicanthic fold varieties to eyelid crease specifics. Single eyelids (monolid), double eyelid, demi eyelid, hooded eyelid, puffy eyelid, we cover it all! At the end, I check to see what kind of Asian eye I have! Note: The epicanthic fold is also known as epicanthal fold, epicanthus, Mongolian fold, plica palpebronasalis and palpebronasal fold. Available Subtitles so far: ENGLISH, GERMAN, SPANISH, PORTUGUESE BRAZIL, INDONESIAN, VIETNAMESE (click 'CC') (Credit: Andrea J, Laura Santos, Vờ Lờ) ★ Help us with subtitles in your language! http://www.youtube.com/timedtext_video?ref=share&v=wsNaBwrL9hg ----------------------- MUSIC ► Ross Bugden https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQKGLOK2FqmVgVwYferltKQ (Track: Flight Hymn) SOURCES http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamafacialplasticsurgery/fullarticle/479760 http://epicanthus.askdefine.com/http://eyelidsurgerymalaysia.blogspot.co.at/2016_02_01_archive.html http://eyelidsurgerymalaysia.blogspot.co.at/2016_02_01_archive.html http://english.teuimps.co.kr/eng/02_eye/eye1_2.php https://www.beautylish.com/a/vcacj/whats-your-eye-shape https://drkotlus.com/asian-eyelid-crease/ http://www.fashionlady.in/have-you-known-the-types-of-monolids/38650 ----------------------- ABOUT We do videos on intriguing & thought-provoking Asiany topics, including stereotypes, history, culture & geography. TEAM KENTO BENTO Script, Narration & Editing by Kento Bento Artwork by Nina Bento ★★ Interested in working with us? We are currently looking for a general assistant, video editor, motion graphics editor, assistant illustrator, & script editor. Familiarity with our style is crucial. If you're someone who's passionate about 'Asiany' topics, above the age of 24, fluent in English & with great attention to detail (perfectionist personality!), send a short introductory email and examples of your relevant works to [email protected] with the position, age, & your desired start date noted in the email title. (Note: If above conditions are not met, you may not get a response) SOCIAL MEDIA ► Patreon: www.patreon.com/kentobento (fan funding!) ► Twitter: www.twitter.com/kentobento2015 ► Facebook: www.facebook.com/kentobento2015 BUSINESS CONTACT ► [email protected] (for general enquiries, collaborations & sponsorships) ► [email protected] (for job applications) .
Views: 1042735 Kento Bento
How to write a good essay: Paraphrasing the question
 
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Do you sometimes struggle to begin writing an essay when taking an exam? Good news! There is an important writing skill that will help you improve your essay introductions. This technique is called "paraphrasing", and it means rewriting something using different words. In this lesson, I will teach you how to paraphrase successfully and how to change essay questions into your own words. These skills are very useful for university and high school students, as well as any students writing English proficiency exams like the TOEFL or IELTS. TAKE THE QUIZ: http://www.engvid.com/how-to-write-a-good-essay-paraphrasing-the-question/ WATCH NEXT: Essay Writing – 6 ways to compare: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F8WSzwBD7GQ TRANSCRIPT Hi, there. My name is Emma, and in today's video I'm going to teach you something very important for if you're taking any type of test that has a writing component. So, if you are taking the IELTS, the TOEFL, the CELPIP, even just a university test, it can be any type of test, but if you're asked to write something like an essay or a paragraph, this video is for you. Okay? So I'm going to teach you a very important skill that will help improve your marks when it comes to writing on tests. So, let's get started. So, I have here an essay question. This question is actually... I've seen it on the IELTS. You know, you have similar types of questions on the TOEFL, sometimes in university. The question is this: "Education is the single most important factor in the development of a country. Do you agree or disagree?" Or maybe: "To what extent do you agree or disagree?" So, this is an example of a question you might be asked. Now, a problem a lot of students have is in their answer to this question. They see this, and they think: "Okay, education is the most important factor in the development of a country, yes, I agree." So then they... Or: "I disagree", and they start writing. And what do they write? Usually the very first thing students will write is this: "I agree that education is the single most important factor in the development of a country because..." So, what is the problem with this? Is there any problem to start off your essay with something like this, or to start off your answer? There's a big problem. So I want you to take a moment and think: "What could be the problem with starting your essay off with this sentence?" Okay, well, if you noticed, you have here the word: "education, education, is, is, the single most important, most important factor". If you notice, these are the same. They're the exact same, except for: "I agree that" and "because". The student, here, has used the exact same wording that is in the question. So, if you do this on the IELTS-and many students do this, same with on the TOEFL-you actually will lose marks, and same with in university, because you're not showing your abilities; you're just copying what somebody else has said or what the essay question is. So, in this video, I'm going to show you first off... First off, I'm going to tell you: Don't do this, don't copy. And I'm going to teach you ways in order to improve yourself and your answer by changing this wording. How can you change your introduction so it's different than what the question is? Okay? So, let's look at how to make these changes. Okay, so what we are going to do in order to change the question into a proper answer that doesn't just copy the question, is we are going to paraphrase. So, the word here is: "paraphrase". This might be a new word for you. What does it mean to paraphrase something? Well, when we paraphrase, it means we take a sentence that, you know... We take somebody else's sentence and we change it into our own words. Okay? So, we change the words of a sentence, we also change maybe the sentence structure, but we keep all the same meaning. Okay? So, the meaning from the sentence you copy, it stays the same, same meaning, but different words and different sentence structure. Okay? So it's in your words, but this other person's meaning. So, we are going to paraphrase this example of a question into our own words. So, first we're going to look at how to do that using vocabulary and synonyms. So, we have here the same question: "Education is the single most important factor in the development of a country." How can we put this into new words or our own words that keep the same meaning? Well, we can use synonyms. So, this might be a new word for you, too. A "synonym". "Synonyms" are words that have the same meaning, but are different words.
√ Writing about Newspaper Articles | Text Type Studies | English
 
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#iitutor #English #TextTypeStudies https://www.iitutor.com Writing about Newspaper Articles You can write about newspaper articles in a number of ways: and not just comprehension. To fully interpret the validity, effects and techniques of a news article, you need to ask some questions. How do they Grab Attention? An article can grab attention through a headline, an image, or both. The relationship between headline and image attracts a reader through by interest or emotional response. The first line of the article is important for maintaining this interest, or getting them to ‘click’. Are they Truly Objective? This bias can be seen in any way that a journalist adds personal opinion, be it political, social, cultural, religious or ideological. While many articles are completely objective and impersonal some do indicate bias or emotion. You must analyse what effect this bias has, if any, on the trustworthiness and validity of the article, and be critical. What Sources do they Use? A good test of the trustworthiness of a news article comes from the evidence or source that a news story uses. Some are generally trustworthy such as: Government spokesperson, police, professors, scientists, the subject of the article, photographic evidence Some are less than trustworthy, such as: Witnesses, ‘a source close to’, unrecognised ‘experts’, the subject of the article, ‘man on the street’ What Kind of Story is it? Not all news stories are the same. All stories connect and attract readers in different ways. They can be humorous, scandalous, sensational, fear-mongering, heart-warming or reflective. All stories want to connect with reader in some way, and through this, they appeal directly or indirectly to emotions and interests. How does it use Language? The final question you should ask is how techniques are used, such as: Exaggerated or sensationalist choices of language Emotional or figurative language Formal or colloquial style of language in reporting Puns or rhetorical questions in headline Any distinct layout or visual choices The file name must be E06103.flv
Views: 13 iitutor.com
Paraphrasing:  The Basic Steps
 
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It is a necessary academic skill to paraphrase ideas when writing and reading. This video gives two examples of how to paraphrase.
Views: 462298 DiveIn Learning
Writing Letters: formal & informal English
 
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A letter to your friend and a cover letter for a job application are written very differently. Whether you work in business or are taking the general IELTS or CELPIP test, knowing the difference between informal and formal writing is a skill you should have. Watch this writing lesson, take our quiz, and check out our resource page to become a better writer. - Use the resource: http://www.engvid.com/english-resource/formal-informal-english/ - Take the quiz: http://www.engvid.com/writing-letters-formal-informal-english/ http://www.engvid.com/ TRANSCRIPT: Hello, my name is Emma, and in today's lesson we are going to learn about writing. What kind of writing? Writing letters. Okay? So this is important for people who work in business. It's also important for people who like to write letters to their friends maybe or to their grandparents in English. Also, it is very... It is a very useful video for anyone who is taking the general IELTS test. So if you're taking not academic, but general, this is an important video. And also, if you plan to immigrate to Canada and you want to do the Canadian immigration test which is called: "the CELPIP", this video is also... It will also be useful and helpful to you. Okay? So let's get started. What do I mean by "formal" and "informal"? "Informal" means something you would write to your friends, something you would write to your parents, - well, probably your parents unless you're afraid of your parents, then you might be more formal -, your classmates, your coworkers. Okay? So this is... It means it's not formal; it's for people you know well. On the other hand, "formal" English we use with strangers, we use with our boss, in the workplace, we use it in these different ways. So it's the English you really have to think about, whereas informal is kind of the relaxed English. So relaxed, serious. Okay? So, sometimes you will have to write a letter formally, maybe to your boss or your company, other times maybe you're on holiday and you want to write a letter to your friend, you'll use informal English. So what is the difference? Let's see. Informal English uses contractions. What are contractions? "Didn't", "wouldn't", "couldn't", "haven't", "hasn't". So if you see a verb with an apostrophe and then a "t", that is a contraction. Okay? It's very important to know this because in formal writing, you don't use contractions. "Didn't" would be: "Did not". I can write that for you. "Did not". Couldn't: could not, haven't: have not, can't: cannot. Okay? So that's one major difference. Another major difference between formal and informal writing is the use of idioms; the use of certain expressions. If I'm writing to my friend, maybe I'll say: "Oh, you know, I've been very under the weather lately." Meaning: I've been very sick. If I'm writing to my boss, I won't use idioms. If I'm writing a formal letter, I will not use idioms. Those aren't good to use in formal writing. Phrasal verbs, this is another thing we find in informal writing. What is a phrasal verb? It's a verb that has a preposition. Okay? So, for example: "find out", "find" is a verb, "out" is the preposition. "Go" is the verb, "up" is the preposition. So the... The preposition adds a different meaning to the verb. Phrasal verbs are very difficult to learn; we have so many of them in English. My students have told me phrasal verbs are one of the hardest parts of learning English, but it's possible, you can do it.
Writing in the style of a scientific paper
 
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Dr. Eoin O'Gorman describes the positives and negatives in three student reports from the Global Change Biology module, aimed at teaching students about the scientific process.
Views: 90 Eoin O'Gorman
Why Asians Are Supposedly 'Cuter' (Scientific Breakdown)
 
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Patreon Video: The Curious Case of Neoteny in 'Asian Eyes': https://patreon.com/kentobento (buy us a coffee!) EastMeetEast Dating App: https://EastMeetEast.com/kentobento, the #1 Asian dating app w/400,000+ singles (N. America & worldwide!) *FOR THOSE ASKING, you don't have to be Asian to join, anyone can sign up. Other videos you may like: This Is The Greatest Bank Heist in Japanese History: https://youtu.be/gbeN-2ErxBw What Kind of 'Asian Eyes' Do You Have? (Test Yourself): https://youtu.be/wsNaBwrL9hg 10 REASONS Why Asians Don't Get FAT: https://youtu.be/xIqJR6xfMro Why Asians Are Yellow-Skinned: https://youtu.be/rVcNy7bJyww 'Asian Eyes' Are More Common Than You Think: https://youtu.be/WxTnVWgOGLc Available Subtitles so far: English (click 'CC') Help us with subtitles in your language! http://www.youtube.com/timedtext_video?v=QPrP3Y4SO_E&ref=share Music: Funky Element by Bensound In Case You Forgot by Otis McDonald Backed Vibes Rollin at 5 by Kevin Macloed Not for Nothing by Otis McDonald Our Great Patrons: Bruce Clezy, Goldberry Bombadil, Coke, Heise Huntington, Ethan Delcambre, Andy, Eric Schmitt, Frederik Nilsson, Sid Olav Skar, Ashley Z, Greg Baker, Michael the Excalipoor Channel Description: We do videos on intriguing & thought-provoking Asiany topics, including stereotypes, history, culture & geography. Team: Kento Bento - director, researcher, script writer, narrator, video editor, motion graphics Charlie Rodriguez - motion graphics (https://instagram.com/iguez_art/) Nina Bento - official cheerleader ★★ Interested in working with us? We are currently looking for a general assistant, video editor, motion graphics editor, assistant illustrator, & script editor. Familiarity with our style is crucial. If you're someone who's passionate about 'Asiany' topics, above the age of 24, fluent in English & with great attention to detail (perfectionist personality!), send a short introductory email and examples of your relevant works to [email protected] with the position, age, & your desired start date noted in the email title. (Note: If above conditions are not met, you may not get a response) Twitter: https://twitter.com/kentobento2015 Facebook: https://facebook.com/kentobento2015 Patreon: https://patreon.com/kentobento Email: [email protected] --------------------- WHY ASIANS ARE 'CUTER' (SCIENTIFIC BREAKDOWN) So, here’s a statement: ‘Asians are cuter’. If you were offended by that, this video is probably not what you think. Everyone has their own opinions of what constitutes as attractive. But I’m not necessarily talking about ‘attractiveness’ here; I’m talking about ‘cuteness’. Cuteness is a term describing a type of attractiveness commonly associated with youth and appearance. It’s also a scientific concept. So when I say ‘Asians are cuter’, well, they arguably are; and that’s including males, not just females. Now, compared to adults, common features for infants across all ethnic groups include larger heads, flatter faces, reduction of the brow ridge, hairlessness, thinner bones, reduced muscle mass, smaller physical size, shorter arms, shorter legs, just to name a few - and of course this is largely why people find babies cute. If they didn’t have these features and proportions, they’d more so resemble miniature adults and that’s kind of creepy. The video covers: - Neoteny in East Asians - How retention of neotenous, childlike traits relate to ethnicity - Neoteny in humans in general - Sexual attraction to neotenous traits - Asian fever vs Cuteness fever - Neotenous features vs Non-neotenous features - Gene Mutations that gave East Asians their distinctive appearance - Neoteny's role in sexual selection - Are small and slanted stereotypical 'Asian Eyes' neotenous? - Japan's kawaii culture (South Korea & China as well) - Psychological neoteny - Logan Paul's immature antics - & more! - Special thanks to our sponsor, East Meet East.
Views: 1421806 Kento Bento
How to Study Effectively for School or College - Top 6 Science-Based Study Skills
 
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How to study effectively with 6 essential skills. Boost your study performance with strategies recommended by science - The ANSWER Method. These tips are for high school or university students preparing for exams or wanting to learn more effectively. For free downloadable posters about these six strategies for effective learning, click this link - https://www.dropbox.com/s/sofzb2m3sqzwvlv/6%20Strategies%20for%20Effective%20Learning.pdf?dl=1 This video is a collaboration between The Learning Scientists (http://www.learningscientists.org/) and Memorize Academy (https://www.memorize.academy). EXAMPLES of specific Elaboration questions from MATH You're studying calculus. The topic is “derivatives”. How do derivatives work? Well, they are the rate of the change. How does that work? You take a look at one point, then you take a look at a prior point, over some interval. And then you take the difference divided by the interval. As that interval approaches zero, you have the instantaneous rate of change. Why does this happen? Because “instantaneous” means that the interval is nothing. SCIENCE Imagine you are studying neural communication, maybe in a biology, neuroscience, or psychology class. How does neural communication work? If we look at one neuron, the dendrites receive messages from many other neurons, and then the messages converge in the soma. If there is enough of a positive charge within the soma, then an action potential will occur, and an electrical signal goes down the axon. When the signal reaches the terminal buttons, neurotransmitters release into the synapse where they communicate with the dendrites of the next neuron. Why does this happen? The neurotransmitters are chemicals that allow neurons to communicate with one another. The pattern of activation among different neurons (which neurons fire, how quickly, what neurotransmitters they release) determines the message in your brain. You might then ask, how does the axon work? The axon is a long tail-like structure that produces the electrical signal. How does the signal travel? The axon is covered in myelin sheath, a fatty substance that insulates the axon. The myelin sheath works like the rubber around the cord of an electrical appliance, and it serves to make the electricity travel faster. Why have myelin sheath? Because we need our neurons to be able to send signals fast, since we need to be able to react, make decisions, move quickly, perceive feeling in our skin instantly, etc. Make sure to compare ideas to learn how they are similar and different. For example, an axon and terminal buttons are both parts of a neuron; but, the axon sends an electrical signal while the terminal buttons release chemicals. Both Schizophrenia and Parkinson’s disease are related to the neurotransmitter dopamine, but Schizophrenia is the result of too much dopamine while Parkinson’s disease is the result of too little dopamine. Also, try to make connections to your own memories or experiences, and compare ideas to learn how they are similar and different. We already made the connection from myelin sheath on axons to the rubber on cords to electrical appliances. Here is another example: a family member or close friend who suffers from Schizophrenia disease is suffering from too much dopamine. This means that too much dopamine is being released, by the terminal buttons, into the synapse. A doctor could give them a drug to reduce the dopamine in their brain, called a dopamine antagonist. If too much of this drug is used, the patient might begin developing symptoms similar to Parkinson’s disease. How would a dopamine antagonist work? … continue asking yourself elaborative questions! HISTORY Imagine you’re studying World War II, and the attack on Pearl Harbor. You could ask yourself, how did this attack happen? On December 7, 1941, the Imperial Japanese Navy attacked the United States Naval Base at Pearl Harbor. The attack included Japanese fighter planes, bombers, and torpedo planes. Why did this happen? The Japanese intended to destroy the United States’ Pacific Fleet so that it could not interfere with Japanese operations. Here you could also ask another type of question: What was the result of this historic event? Well, Japanese casualties were light, while they damaged eight U.S. Navy battleships. The Arizona was among those that the Japanese sunk, and was not raised from the shallow water. U.S. aircrafts were also destroyed, and 2,403 Americans were killed (1,178 were injured). Why is this event important? The day after the attack, Roosevelt delivered his Infamy Speech, the United States declared war on Japan, and Japanese-Americans were then relocated to internment camps. You could then go on: how did the U.S. enter the war? How did the Pearl Harbor attack lead up to the release of the atomic bomb? How did the war end? And so on. There are so many ways to explain the idea and add details!
Views: 2012039 Memorize Academy
The Molecular Shape of You (Ed Sheeran Parody) | A Capella Science
 
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I'm in love with your bonding orbitals. Support A Capella Science: http://patreon.com/acapellascience Subscribe! https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=acapellascience ---------------- NANA APP: iOS: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/record-your-music-sing-nana/id540360389?mt=8 Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.nanamusic.android&hl=en My nana account: http://nana-music.com/users/4398582/ Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/nana.Sing.your.Life/ Instagram: @nanamusic_official Website: https://nana-music.co.jp/en/ ---------------- A CAPELLA SCIENCE STUFF: Patreon: http://patreon.com/acapellascience Facebook: http://facebook.com/acapellascience Twitter: http://twitter.com/acapellascience Bohemian Gravity poster: https://store.dftba.com/products/bohemian-gravity-poster MP3: http://timblais.bandcamp.com Follow me @acapellascience on Twitter, Instagram, Snapchat! ---------------- LYRICS: A dot isn't the best way to try to sum up how electrons come and go They are the states of a matter field that follows and equation that Dirac wrote The Schrodinger part of the whole equation will just lead In sub-c when it expands Now get that Coulomb and add it in with a proton And watch them start to dance As hydrogen it's like "Oh proton I feel your tug Central potential dip down pulling on me But I'm not falling in deep No that would break uncertainty" "Say oh Electrons move too much Slow down your pace and put that orbit on me Come on now follow my lead Come come on now follow my lead Orbitals take the shape they do As stable states of the quantum rules And when a one approaches two They combine and they're bonding Thus hydrogen as a rule Is found in nature as H2 Energy configuring a molecule Diatomically bonding Low high low high low high low high Diatomically bonding (x3) Energy cofiguring a molecule When orbitals take the shape they do 1/2 spin'll give a lepton a twin One up one down in the ground state With S and P in quadruple degeneracy The second shell can be filled up with eight The higher angular powers spread out like beautiful flowers In middle families they come into play Well here's a carbon with 6e This ain't nothing tricksy But we're gonna make some methane today With hydrogen it's like "Oh atoms I feel your tug Got my electrons bugged out pulling on me Come on now settle round me I'll hybridize to sp3" "Say oh Carbon here's touch Spread out 109.47 degrees Come on now follow our lead Come come on now follow our lead" Molecules take the shape they do Combining states of the quantum rules Like when a shell goes sp2 For sigma pi double bonding And as widely as their purview They spread out in the molecule Look at benzene in a ring they hold it true Aromatically bonding Low high low high low high low high Aromatically bonding (x3) Look at benzene in a ring they hold it true When orbitals take the shape they do Come bond with me baby, come bond (x8) Polymers take the shape they do Combining base-level residues Like RNA's ACGU Look they're hydrogen bonding! Peptides make a chain and group In beta pleat sheets and corkscrews With these secondary links they fold and move They're all over your body Come bond with me baby, come bond (x6) You're a chemical machine It's best you knew That molecules take the shape of you. Copyright 2017 Tim Blais and A Capella Science Original music by Ed Sheeran
Views: 4638334 acapellascience
How to write a good essay
 
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How to write an essay- brief essays and use the principles to expand to longer essays/ even a thesis you might also wish to check the video on Interview technique (now on this channel too!)
Views: 3145596 zontulfilmsltd
The Best Elevator Pitch
 
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Learn how to answer what do you do and leave a lasting impression! Do you ever get anxious answering this question? Or maybe, you are so used to being asked this question that you get bored answering? If your answer is yes to either of the above questions, then this video is for you! Your elevator pitch is incredibly important -- your level of engagement increases your memorability and impact. In this video, I will teach you the body language and people skills you can use to make your elevator pitch interesting, unforgettable, and influential. Want more examples of great elevator pitches? 👉 https://www.scienceofpeople.com/elevator-pitch/ ****** If you’re ready to level up your charisma, check out our flagship course, People School: http://bit.ly/2yUf0WR People School is a 12 step video based training program designed to increase your interpersonal intelligence. People School focuses on the four core competencies of Business PQ: • Empower Leaders and Managers • Leverage Science-Backed Communication Tools • Activate Effective Teamwork and Collaboration • Improve Client Relations & Sales Join the waitlist for People School here 👉 http://bit.ly/2yUf0WR ****** Vanessa Van Edwards is Lead Investigator at Science of People — where she unlocks the formulas and patterns behind human behavior for hundreds of thousands of students in over 200 countries. She is the national bestselling author of Captivate: The Science of Succeeding With People, available in 14 languages around the world. Her work has been featured on CNN, NPR, BBC, Fast Company and dozens more. Can’t get enough of Science of People? Check out our Praiseworthy Performance audio guide  👉 https://www.scienceofpeople.com/start/ ****** Did you enjoy the video? If so, give it a like above! Subscribe to our channel for more human behavior hacks and communication strategies 👉https://youtube.com/c/Vanessa-Van-Edwards P.S. Make sure to keep up with us by clicking the bell!
Views: 304570 Vanessa Van Edwards
Summer Camp 2014 - ESL Science Bridge Testing
 
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English as a Second Language (ESL) campers had a great time building and then testing their creations.
Views: 1483 MMAHarlingen
Susan McConnell (Stanford): Designing effective scientific presentations
 
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https://www.ibiology.org/professional-development/scientific-presentations/ What is the best way to give a talk that engages and informs your audience? Dr. McConnell gives helpful advice on preparing and presenting an effective scientific talk. She reviews the basics of PowerPoint or Key Note and gives advice on choosing fonts, colors and slide styles. She also recommends ways to structure your talk so the audience stays awake and engaged. Her final recommendation is practice, practice, practice! Whether you are a graduate student presenting journal club or a tenured professor giving an invited lecture, this talk is sure to prove useful.
Views: 207836 iBiology
Body language, the power is in the palm of your hands | Allan Pease | TEDxMacquarieUniversity
 
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Never miss a talk! SUBSCRIBE to the TEDx channel: http://bit.ly/1FAg8hB Allan Pease is an Honorary Professor of Psychology at ULIM International University, who researches and studies selling relationships and human communication. He teaches simple, field-tested skills and techniques that get results. And he delivers his message in a humorous way, which motivates people to want to use. Allan's own experience and record in the field of selling, motivating and training is equalled by few others. He is a born achiever, starting his career at the age of 10. Globally known as "Mr Body Language", his programs are used by businesses and governments to teach powerful relationship skills. His messages are relevant to any area of life that involves winning people over and getting them to like you, co-operate, follow you or say 'yes'. For more information on Allan Pease, click on the link below: https://www.facebook.com/AllanandBarbaraPease In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
Views: 4712629 TEDx Talks
If Educational Videos Were Filmed Like Music Videos
 
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There's a reason music videos look strange. I could just talk about framerate, cuts and continuity... or I could get an actual music video director. And a leaf blower. Directed by: Sammy Paul https://twitter.com/icoepr Produced by: Cambria Bailey-Jones https://twitter.com/cambriabailey Guy Larsen https://twitter.com/thisisguido Director of Photography: Ciaran O'Brien https://twitter.com/ciaranobrien Featuring: dodie https://youtube.com/doddleoddle Dancers: Deepraj Singh Annie Fox Leanne Vincent Liam Wallace Production Design: Guy Larsen Gaffer: Christine Alexander Camera Assistant: Rachel Hutchings Editor: Sammy Paul Colour grade: Ciaran O'Brien Runner: Jenna Bailey-Jones Extras: Michelle Martin Gianluca Suppa Xina Jailey Special thanks to: Grant Stevens Bob Stevens Jenny Stevens Matt Parker Maths Gear http://www.mathsgear.co.uk YouTube Space London and the team A Penny4 Production https://www.penny4.co.uk/ Maths Gear didn't actually pay for product placement in this video. The dice were surprisingly painful. I'm at http://tomscott.com on Twitter at http://twitter.com/tomscott on Facebook at http://facebook.com/tomscott and on Instagram as tomscottgo
Views: 1648567 Tom Scott
After watching this, your brain will not be the same | Lara Boyd | TEDxVancouver
 
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In a classic research-based TEDx Talk, Dr. Lara Boyd describes how neuroplasticity gives you the power to shape the brain you want. Recorded at TEDxVancouver at Rogers Arena on November 14, 2015. YouTube Tags: brain science, brain, stroke, neuroplasticity, science, motor learning, identity, TED, TEDxVancouver, TEDxVancouver 2015, Vancouver, TEDx, Rogers Arena, Vancouver speakers, Vancouver conference, ideas worth spreading, great idea, Our knowledge of the brain is evolving at a breathtaking pace, and Dr. Lara Boyd is positioned at the cutting edge of these discoveries. In 2006, she was recruited by the University of British Columbia to become the Canada Research Chair in Neurobiology and Motor Learning. Since that time she has established the Brain Behaviour Lab, recruited and trained over 40 graduate students, published more than 80 papers and been awarded over $5 million in funding. Dr. Boyd’s efforts are leading to the development of novel, and more effective, therapeutics for individuals with brain damage, but they are also shedding light on broader applications. By learning new concepts, taking advantage of opportunities, and participating in new activities, you are physically changing who you are, and opening up a world of endless possibility. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx
Views: 23232196 TEDx Talks
Your personality and your brain | Scott Schwefel | TEDxBrookings
 
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This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. We all have a unique personality, but we also show up to others in ways we don’t know. Understanding how our brains become consciously aware of ourselves, and in turn, everyone else teaches how we can connect, adapt and ultimately influence others. It all starts with knowing when we are truly self-aware, and when we aren’t, how to get there quickly and easily. Scott Schwefel built and sold Minnesota’s largest technology training company. To get there he used personality assessments to help his people understand each other and understand clients and customers. His study of personality led to an awareness of brain science and how our brains enable us to communicate with each other. Scott has taught these principles of brain science and communications techniques throughout North America, Europe and Asia, and to over 1300 CEOs globally. About TEDx, x = independently organized event In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
Views: 2215586 TEDx Talks
The surprisingly charming science of your gut | Giulia Enders
 
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Ever wonder how we poop? Learn about the gut -- the system where digestion (and a whole lot more) happens -- as doctor and author Giulia Enders takes us inside the complex, fascinating science behind it, including its connection to mental health. It turns out, looking closer at something we might shy away from can leave us feeling more fearless and appreciative of ourselves. Check out more TED Talks: http://www.ted.com The TED Talks channel features the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and more. Follow TED on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/TEDTalks Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED Subscribe to our channel: https://www.youtube.com/TED
Views: 333213 TED
HOW TO Give a Great Presentation - 7 Presentation Skills and Tips to Leave an Impression
 
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Use my FREE 27 Confidence-Boosting Hacks: https://practicalpie.com/confidence/ Want my TOP 10 book list?: https://practicalpie.com/book-list/ Get a girl to like you using psychology (52% off!): https://courses.practicalpie.com/p/the-psychology-of-attraction/?product_id=455712&coupon_code=GETGIRLSYT Learn the best tips and tricks to give a great presentation. If you’ve ever given a presentation before, you might know where you can improve and what your strengths are, but Dana has compiled a list of 7 presentation skills and ideas everyone needs to know to make a lasting impression. Dana Blouin is an entrepreneur currently living in Bangkok, Thailand where he is the co-founder and CEO of his newest company, Mango Labs, a tech startup that is building a new quantified-self platform. Over the past two years, Dana has given hundreds of presentations and talks all over the world. These are the top 7 tips he has put together based on his experiences. Dana Blouin: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtlSgFVrUXL_Z_egKuHK21Q ---My Details--- What I make my videos with: http://bit.ly/1QxBJI0 Blinkist Awesome Book Summaries FREE trial: http://bit.ly/2cCoWxV Insta: https://www.instagram.com/practical_psych/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/practical_psych Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/practicalpsych Check out MY Passive Income Ebook: http://bit.ly/PsychologyIncome
Views: 617988 Practical Psychology
The Science of Flirting: Being a H.O.T. A.P.E. | Jean Smith | TEDxLSHTM
 
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Is this person flirting with me? This question has plagued us from nearly the beginning of time. Social anthropologist Jean Smith, or ‘flirtologist’ if you will, demonstrates her 6 simple steps known as “H.O.T. A.P.E.” to help answer that very question. And it will forever change your perception of flirting from being a stranger’s evaluation of your worth into what it should be: a fun game! Jean's purpose in life is understanding how people flirt. And people flirt differently in different cultures. She uses her background as a cultural and social anthropologist to help teach people how to flirt – to gain confidence and happiness in their lives by assisting them to projective a positive image of themselves. , she uses research and studies to emphasize the skills that we can all learn to interact more effectively. Jean also uses practical activities and interaction to bridge the brain and the body and apply the information to make our daily lives more rewarding. The basis of Jeans teachings comes from her background as a social anthropologist.. A few years ago, Jean published, The Flirt Interpreter, which is an accessible analysis of the research she conducted into the flirting behaviour of people in the cities of London, New York, Paris and Stockholm. She conducted 250 face-to-face interviews to ascertain flirting behaviour. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx
Views: 4531338 TEDx Talks
Rhyme: Why Eminem is one of the most impressive lyricists ever
 
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Please consider checking out my blog: http://lofalexandria.com/ or following me on twitter: https://twitter.com/lofalexandria I tried to find this amazing video breaking down Eminem's rhymes for a discussion on reddit about Eminem and it had been removed from youtube after the creator's youtube channel was closed down. Thought I would re-upload for everyone to enjoy. The channel this video was originally from was closed due to some legal trouble for the creator: http://www.dailydot.com/news/youtube-mike-lombardo-arrested-fbi-child-porn/ I figured there is no harm in uploading it again since it is not likely he is going to be back on the web any time soon to reupload himself.
Views: 3036067 Library of Alexandria
Life Cycle of a Butterfly | #aumsum #kids #education #lifecycle #butterfly
 
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Our topic for today is Life Cycle of a Butterfly. A butterfly lays eggs on the leaves of a plant. These eggs hatch and young ones called larvae or caterpillars come out of the eggs. The caterpillar starts feeding on the leaves and starts to grow. It sheds its skin several times so that it can grow. Once the caterpillar is big enough, it stops eating. It then forms a protective layer around itself. This stage is called chrysalis or pupa. The caterpillar remains motionless in the cocoon for about 10-15 days. Inside the cocoon, the caterpillar undergoes a series of changes. After about 15 days, a beautiful adult butterfly emerges out of the cocoon. These series of changes in the life cycle of a butterfly is called metamorphosis.
Views: 4536363 It's AumSum Time
Think Fast, Talk Smart: Communication Techniques
 
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Communication is critical to success in business and life. Concerned about an upcoming interview? Anxious about being asked to give your thoughts during a meeting? Fearful about needing to provide critical feedback in the moment? You are not alone! Learn and practice techniques that will help you speak spontaneously with greater confidence and clarity, regardless of content and context. Recorded on October 25, 2014, in collaboration with the Stanford Alumni Association as part of Stanford Reunion Homecoming and the Graduate School of Business Fall Reunion/Alumni Weekend. Speaker: Matt Abrahams, ’91 Matt Abrahams is a lecturer at the Stanford Graduate School of Business, teaching strategic communication; he also teaches public speaking in Stanford’s Continuing Studies Program.
Learning styles & the importance of critical self-reflection | Tesia Marshik | TEDxUWLaCrosse
 
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The belief in learning styles is so widespread, it is considered to be common sense. Few people ever challenge this belief, which has been deeply ingrained in our educational system. Teachers are routinely told that in order to be effective educators, they must identify & cater to individual students' learning styles; it is estimated that around 90% of students believe that they have a specific learning style but research suggests that learning styles don't actually exist! This presentation focuses on debunking this myth via research findings, explaining how/why the belief in learning styles is problematic, and examining the reasons why the belief persists despite the lack of evidence. Dr. Tesia Marshik is an Assistant Professor of Psychology at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse. Her research interests in educational psychology include student motivation, self-regulation, and teacher-student relationships. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx
Views: 552463 TEDx Talks
What makes a good life? Lessons from the longest study on happiness | Robert Waldinger
 
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What keeps us happy and healthy as we go through life? If you think it's fame and money, you're not alone – but, according to psychiatrist Robert Waldinger, you're mistaken. As the director of 75-year-old study on adult development, Waldinger has unprecedented access to data on true happiness and satisfaction. In this talk, he shares three important lessons learned from the study as well as some practical, old-as-the-hills wisdom on how to build a fulfilling, long life. TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more. Find closed captions and translated subtitles in many languages at http://www.ted.com/translate Follow TED news on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/tednews Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED Subscribe to our channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/TEDtalksDirector
Views: 11925373 TED
TED's secret to great public speaking | Chris Anderson
 
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There's no single formula for a great talk, but there is a secret ingredient that all the best ones have in common. TED Curator Chris Anderson shares this secret — along with four ways to make it work for you. Do you have what it takes to share an idea worth spreading? TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more. Find closed captions and translated subtitles in many languages at http://www.ted.com/translate Follow TED news on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/tednews Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED Subscribe to our channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/TEDtalksDirector
Views: 1026865 TED
How To Write A Research Paper Fast -  Research Paper Writing Tips
 
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Please watch: "7 Meal Plans for Weight Loss and Muscle Gain" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tSNZIHP5DPk --~-- http://www.waysandhow.com Subscribe to Waysandhow: https://goo.gl/RK2SbN Research paper writing tips, step by step tutorial and tips on how to write a research paper fast. Through the course of school, and sometimes your career, you have to write a research paper at one time or another. Usually you know enough about what to write; however, writing is seldom anyone's favorite way to spend time. In the pileup of work, writing often sinks to the bottom of priorities. At crunch time, you then need to double up in your efforts to make the deadline. Only the knowledge of how to write a research paper fast can save you. Waysandhow. ---------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Google+: https://plus.google.com/+waysandhow Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/waysandhow/ Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/waysandhow/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/waysandhow
Views: 495295 WaysAndHow
How to Fall Asleep in 2 Minutes According to the US Navy
 
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Do you have trouble falling asleep? Do you toss and turn at night? A good night’s sleep is necessary for optimal health. So if you’re one of the millions of people in the world who suffers from a sleep disorder or you want to fall asleep faster, watch this video to learn a trick straight from the US military. The amount of sleep a person needs depends greatly on their age. Knowing how much you should be sleeping can help you figure out if your sleep routine works or if it needs tweaking. Babies normally sleep for most of the day (around 16 hours), teenagers require about 9 hours a day, and adults require 7 to 8 hours a day. TIMESTAMPS: What insomnia can lead to 1:44 Step 1 2:42 Step 2 3:07 Step 3 3:34 Step 4 3:43 Step 5 4:00 Other tips to fall asleep quickly 6:13 #soundsleep #insomnia #weightgain Music by Epidemic Sound https://www.epidemicsound.com/ SUMMARY: - According to the American Sleep Association, 50–70 million US adults suffer from sleep disorders. It’s estimated that around 20% of people worldwide suffer from sleep deprivation. - Insomnia can be common if people are under a great amount of stress, experiencing big life changes, or having emotional difficulties. - If you suffer from insomnia, a lack of sleep can cause hormonal imbalances, which lead to weight gain, slower reaction times, irritability, memory problems, depression, and headaches. - Lie face up in bed. Relax your facial muscles, including your tongue, jaw, and the muscles around your eyes. If you realize you have a frown, really focus on releasing the area in the center of your forehead. - Drop your shoulders as low as possible. This will also help you stretch and release the tension in your neck. Then relax your upper and lower arm on one side, and then try it with the other arm. - Breathe out, and relax your chest. Feel your lungs fill up with air. - Relax your legs. Release the tension from your thighs first, and then let the relaxation travel down to your calves. Finally, focus on your feet and ankles. - Now that the muscles in your body are relaxed, it’s time to clear your mind completely. - When the pilots were trained in this exercise, they performed it sitting down on a chair. In those exercises, they put their feet flat on the floor, placed their hands on their laps, and let them go limp. Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 15245288 BRIGHT SIDE
7 Secrets of A Woman's Mind | Women's Dating Psychology | BeerBiceps
 
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Subscribe to our HINDI YouTube Channel : https://www.youtube.com/c/RanveerAllahbadia INSTAGRAM : @beerbiceps https://www.instagram.com/beerbiceps/ TWITTER : @beerbicepsguy https://twitter.com/BeerBicepsGuy TAMIL BeerBiceps : https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdoM4EsNWQdKlNEK_guukNQ Personality Development Playlist : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VcqOFLSiHwQ&list=PLfNW_1ECVaThNObxf-FeQZMKnDy_C3R0C&index=1 Basics of MEN'S MANNERS : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OkrxjbXbytE&index=4&list=PLfNW_1ECVaThNObxf-FeQZMKnDy_C3R0C What's good my bros? I today's video we're talking women's psychology! This video is your ultimate video on MENTAL TURN ONS. We're covering aspects of attraction and dating - what do women like in men? what do girls like in boys? This is your ultimate mental etiquette video. If personality development and seeming more attractive is your game, then this video is going to be your goto! How to be attractive to girls! These are my top 7 tips. With the help of these mental and psychological turn ons, you WILL be playing the dating and relationship advice game very well. This is your bhaiyya, your love guru Ranveer Allahbadia bringing you the top 7 psychological turn ons for girls! Watch, share and subscribe :) ---------------------------------------------- INSTAGRAM : @beerbiceps TWITTER : @beerbicepsguy facebook.com/beerbiceps BeerBiceps - YouTube's first India specific fitness, health, lifestyle, fashion, men's grooming and personality development channel Twitter: @beerbicepsguy Zomato: @beerbiceps Snapchat: @ranveer.1693
Views: 214515 BeerBiceps
Writing the Literature Review (Part One): Step-by-Step Tutorial for Graduate Students
 
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Take the mystery out of this academic assignment. All you do is: (1) Gather the summaries of your sources. (2) Put the summaries in groups based on theme. (4) Write a paragraph on each group of sources with transitions between each source. 4. Add introduction and conclusion paragraphs. You're done! For examples of previously written literature reviews, see: http://libguides.uwf.edu/c.php?g=215199&p=1420828
Views: 1024056 David Taylor
Becky G - Becky from The Block (Official Music Video)
 
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Download “Becky From The Block” on iTunes now: http://smarturl.it/BFTB?IQid=yt Check Out Becky G on Facebook.com/iambeckyg Twitter.com/iambeckyg Instagram.com/iambeckyg iambeckyg.com Music video by Becky G performing Becky from The Block. (C) 2013 Kemosabe Records #BeckyG #BeckyFromTheBlock #Vevo #LatinPop #OfficialMusicVideo
Views: 77410998 BeckyGVEVO
The science of analyzing conversations, second by second | Elizabeth Stokoe | TEDxBermuda
 
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Prof. Elizabeth Stokoe takes a run on what she terms the “conversational racetrack”—the daily race to understand each other when we speak—and explains how to avoid hurdles that trip us up and cause conflict. Elizabeth Stokoe is a British scientist. She studies conversation analysis. She is a professor at Loughborough University. She graduated from the University of Central Lancashire (Preston Poly) in 1993 with a traditional psychology degree. Then Stokoe completed three years PhD research at Nene College (Leicester University) with Dr. Eunice Fisher. Her research included videotaping interaction in university tutorials, and conducting conversation analyses of topic production, topic management, academic identity, and the relevance of gender. She developed these and other interests while working at the Institute of Behavioural Sciences (University of Derby, 1997-2000) and University College Worcester (2000-2002). Stokoe joined the Department of Social Sciences at Loughborough in October 2002 and was promoted to Reader (2007) and Chair (2009). She teaches on the BSc Social Psychology programme, covering modules in relationships, qualitative methods and forensic psychology. Stokoe developed the Conversation Analytic Role-play Method (CARM), an approach based on evidence about what sorts of problems and roadblocks can occur in conversation, as well as the techniques and strategies that best resolve these problems.[2] CARM won Loughborough University's Social Enterprise award (2013). About TEDx, x = independently organized event In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
Views: 640202 TEDx Talks
Science Of Persuasion
 
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http://www.influenceatwork.com This animated video describes the six universal Principles of Persuasion that have been scientifically proven to make you most effective as reported in Dr. Cialdini’s groundbreaking book, Influence. This video is narrated by Dr. Robert Cialdini and Steve Martin, CMCT (co-author of YES & The Small Big). About Robert Cialdini: Dr. Robert Cialdini, Professor Emeritus of Psychology and Marketing, Arizona State University has spent his entire career researching the science of influence earning him a worldwide reputation as an expert in the fields of persuasion, compliance, and negotiation. Dr. Cialdini’s books, including Influence: Science & Practice and Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion, are the result of decades of peer-reviewed published research on why people comply with requests. Influence has sold over 3 million copies, is a New York Times Bestseller and has been published in 30 languages. Because of the world-wide recognition of Dr. Cialdini’s cutting edge scientific research and his ethical business and policy applications, he is frequently regarded as the “Godfather of influence.” To inquire about Dr. Robert Cialdini’s speaking, Steve Martin, CMCT or any of our other Cialdini Method Certified Trainers (CMCTs) please contact INFLUENCE AT WORK at 480.967.6070 or [email protected] About INFLUENCE AT WORK: INFLUENCE AT WORK (IAW®) was founded by Robert Cialdini, Ph.D. as a professional resource to maximize influence results through ethical business applications. Offering participatory workshops and training, keynote presentations and intensive Cialdini Method Certified Trainer (CMCT) programs, IAW serves an international audience. For more information, visit our website at www.influenceatwork.com or call 480.967.6070. To order a poster of the final screen shot, visit https://www.influenceatwork.com/store/#!/Science-of-Persuasion-Animation-Poster/p/37513485/category=9805434 For more information on The Small BIG, visit http://www.thesmallbig.com/. For our latest, animated videos from THE SMALL BIG, visit https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S45ay... - narrated by Dr. Cialdini, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xMOlV... - narrated by Mr. Steve Martin, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S45ay... - narrated by Dr. Noah Goldstein. This animated video was created and produced by TINOPOLIS http://www.tinopolis.com/. Subscribe to our blog at: http://www.insideinfluence.com
Views: 10847453 influenceatwork
Academic research and writing – Chapter 4 Research process – Unit 4 Styles and structural designs
 
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https://academic-research-and-writing.org Academic research and writing Chapter 4 Research process Unit 4 Scientific styles and structural designs Abstract: Chapter 4 introduces you to the research process and its cornerstones. Every research project starts with an open-ended indirect research question, which is implicitly or explicitly accompanied by a research hypothesis. Often a research problem is substantiated by an ad-hoc hypothesis, which advances to a working hypothesis and ultimately will be developed into a scientific hypothesis. The logic and quality of hypotheses can differ and determine the success of the research process. Depending on their inner logic, scientific hypotheses can be formulated as cause-effect hypotheses, distribution hypotheses, correlation hypotheses and difference hypotheses. Based on their quality, scientific hypotheses can be differentiated into nomological hypotheses, quasi-nomological hypotheses and statistical hypotheses. The research approach has to match the research problem to be investigated. Literature-based research, theoretical research, developmental research, quantitative research, qualitative research or a mixture of the aforementioned approaches provide means to tackle a research problem at hand. Different academic disciplines favour different scientific styles that predetermine the applicable research approaches. Three general types of scientific styles are introduced and critically reflected: the theoretical solution-driven style, the empirical solution-driven style and the hypothesis-driven style. Key terms: Research question, thesis, hypothesis, ad-hoc hypothesis, working hypothesis, scientific hypothesis, nomological hypothesis, quasi-nomological hypothesis, statistical hypothesis, philosophical research, literature-based research, theoretical research, developmental research, empirical research, quantitative research, qualitative research, scientific styles Course website: https://academic-research-and-writing... Author's weblog: https://christiandecker.de Supported by: http://icademicus.com
6 Life Hacks for Sharpener YOU SHOULD KNOW
 
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Hello my dear friends,in this video I'm going to show you 6 awesome Life Hacks for Sharpener. That is all folks I wished to share with you! Please subscribe to my YouTube channel with some more interesting video stories still waiting for you further on. Thanks for watching . Music: Ahrix - Nova [NCS Release]: https://youtu.be/FjNdYp2gXRY Follow Ahrix: https://soundcloud.com/ahrix http://www.youtube.com/user/AhrixOffi... NCS Playlists: http://bit.ly/NCSdrumstep http://bit.ly/NCSchillstep http://bit.ly/NCShouse http://bit.ly/NCSdubstep http://bit.ly/NCSdrumandbass
Views: 46178811 ADDYOLOGY
English Language Learners and Next Generation Science Standards
 
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Okhee Lee, PhD, professor of childhood education at New York University, describes how English language learners will need to adapt to next generation science standards at the 2013 ESL/Bilingual Workshop, hosted by the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Education.
Writing a research proposal
 
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Writing a research proposal
Views: 595192 DrSamFiala

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